Freedonia In The News

Article Title: Chinese demand to hit US$ 61 billion by 2015
By: Helen Wright
Publication: International Construction, 6/14/2012
Freedonia Study: Construction Machinery in China (2855)

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Demand for construction machinery in China is forecast to increase +6.2% per year to reach CNY 387 billion (US$ 61 billion) by 2015, according to research company Freedonia. But while this is a robust forecast, it is nevertheless a far cry from the +29% growth seen in the Chinese equipment market between 2005 and 2010.
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Article Title: Construction Expenditures in China Expected to Increase Annually Through 2016
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Publication: Door & Window Manufacturer Magazine, 7/26/2012
Freedonia Study: Construction Machinery in China (2855)

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Construction expenditures in China will increase 8.8 percent per annum in real terms through 2016, according to the Freedonia Group, a Cleveland-based research firm which just released a new study, “Construction Outlook in China.” Although growth is expected to decelerate from the rapid 2006-2011 pace, the country will continue to outperform other major national construction markets, according to the report. Ongoing urbanization and industrialization, rebounding foreign investment funding, rising personal income levels and further population and household growth will all work to drive gains, says the study, adding that further growth will be prevented by a slowdown in the Chinese economy through the forecast period. According to the Freedonia Group, construction expenditures in China are about equally split among the residential building, nonresidential building and nonbuilding construction segments, each of which accounted for around one-third of total construction spending in 2011
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Article Title: Construction spending in China to rise through 2015
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Publication: Rubber & Plastics News, 7/12/2012
Freedonia Study: Construction Machinery in China (2855)

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Freedonia said future expansion will be bolstered by a growing domestic economy, ongoing urbanization and industrialization, rebounding foreign investment funding, continuing efforts to expand and upgrade physical infrastructure, and rising income levels. The three major segments -- residential buildings, non-residential buildings and non-building structures -- each accounted for about one-third of total spending in 2010. These and other trends are presented in “Construction Outlook in China,” a new study from the Beijing office of Freedonia, based in Cleveland. Non-building construction will grow 10.1 percent annually through 2015, with government spending the predominant driver, according to the study. Growth will benefit from state-led efforts to expand and upgrade the country’s transport infrastructure—highways, railways and subways, and airports, the study said.
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