US & Global Economic Impact Analysis and Forecasts

Freedonia analysts and economists are sharing their insights on how major events are impacting different parts of the US and global economies.

Back to the Office…Productivity Needs & Desire for Privacy in the Office Clashing With the Return-to-Office Perks?

Now that more people are used to the privacy of working from home, what adjustments are workers asking for as they return to the office?

Love them or hate them, but after decades of expansive open-concept designs at home and at work, walls are back. In this case, cubicles! Cubicles and semi-private seating where desks are separated by low partitions are making a comeback. Design trends aren’t necessarily toward the “cube farms” of the ‘80s and ‘90s, but something in between that and the “open office” designs with few or no walls. In this modern version, private spaces (cubicles and phone rooms) exist alongside of semi-private spaces (low walls or desks tucked into corners) and open spaces intended for collaboration.

And why do they want to close doors or “hide” from colleagues? Returning to the office also means returning to chatty colleagues, in-office client visits, and noise from perks such as video games and new coffee and snack stations, which might make heads-down, high concentration work more difficult. In that vein, more employees are looking for ways to signal to colleagues when they are available for questions and collaboration (the benefit of in-office work) and when they are not. Doors and walls can help, but some get more creative with color-coded lights, posted signs, or other indicators. Others – including me – use headphones, whether with music and noise cancelling engaged or not, to signal openness to conversations.

Freedonia analysts continue to watch factors such as the employee preferences, changes in design trends, commercial real estate activity and others to see how the office of the future will affect where and how we work.

For more information and discussion of opportunities, see The Freedonia Group’s extensive collection of off-the-shelf research, especially coverage in our construction segment and additional titles such as Work-From-Home Consumer Insights, and Freedonia Focus reports such as Office Furniture: United States, Real Estate: United States, and Office Construction: United States. Additional related reports include Office Coffee Service from our sister publisher Packaged Facts. Freedonia Custom Research is also available for questions requiring tailored market intelligence.


Back to the Office…in the Suburbs?

With more employees resistant to long commutes after a few years of no commutes in the peak of the pandemic era, commercial real estate trends are shifting. While vacancy rates rose sharply in suburban office parks in 2020 and 2021, interest in putting offices closer to where their employees live is driving the more companies to reconsider the suburbs.

In the second quarter of 2022, brokerage firm CBRE Group noted that downtown office vacancy rates in the US surpassed the suburban vacancy rate for the first time in decades. The company noted that vacancy rates in the suburbs fell slightly to 16.8%, while it rose to 17% in city centers.

Still, it’s not just any suburban office that is seeing improvements in vacancy rates, it’s the newer modern offices close to residential neighborhoods, restaurants, and other amenities. Office facility owners that don’t yet fit that description could see better occupancy and higher rents with renovations such as contemporary design, flexible furniture and work spaces, and the addition of technological features designed for pod casting and remote or hybrid meetings. Additional benefits could come from developers reworking dedicated office and light commercial parks into mixed-use development with retail, foodservice, and residential offerings as well.

Freedonia analysts continue to watch factors such as the employee preferences, changes in design trends, commercial real estate activity and others to see how the office of the future will affect where and how we work.

For more information and discussion of opportunities, see The Freedonia Group’s extensive collection of off-the-shelf research, especially coverage in our construction segment and additional titles such as Work-From-Home Consumer Insights, and Freedonia Focus reports such as Office Furniture: United States, Real Estate: United States, and Office Construction: United States. Additional related reports include Office Coffee Service from our sister publisher Packaged Facts. Freedonia Custom Research is also available for questions requiring tailored market intelligence.


The Electric Conversion: France is Offering €4,000 to Those Who Trade Their Car For an E-Bike

In a continuation of a decade-long trend, the use of e-bikes surged in many parts of the world during the COVID-19 pandemic. This happened despite disruptions to supply chains that often resulted in delivery delays or price increases.

Governments have built on the recent rise in interest by offering incentives to consumers to replace gas- or diesel-powered motor vehicles, motorcycles, and scooters with e-bikes. These programs are motivated by the need to address air pollution levels, traffic issues, and climate change challenges. The incentives to switch from motor vehicles to greater use of e-bikes is also targeted to help meet future emissions reduction targets.

Most recently, in August 2022, France increased the subsidy offered to individuals that replace conventional motor vehicles with e-bikes to 4,000 euros as part of efforts to increase the sustainability of transportation. The subsidy – based on a program carried out in Lithuania – was initially adopted in 2021. It was subsequently increased in 2022 because levels of e-bike use in France on a per capita basis continued to lag behind that of neighboring countries such as Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium.

The French government hopes to see the number of people that switched to bicycles and e-bikes to reach 9% in 2024, compared to 3% in 2022. This policy will be complemented by an increase in the length of bike lanes in the country.

Freedonia analysts continue to watch factors such as the spread of incentives, expansions in production capacity, improvements in battery technology, related infrastructure development from bike lanes to charging stations, and consumer sentiment about sustainability issues for direct and indirect effects on the electric transportation industry.

For more information and discussion of opportunities, see The Freedonia Group’s extensive collection of off-the-shelf research, especially coverage in transportation-related industries with titles such as Global E-Bikes, Global Motorcycles, Global Hybrid & Electric Vehicles, and Bicycles: United States. Freedonia Custom Research is also available for questions requiring tailored market intelligence.

  Automotive & Transport      Consumer Goods